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20130819
20130819
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when they call. we address the calls accordingly. we tend to use the numbers favorably. >> back to what this chief said, i certainly understand the fact that staffing drives a lot of this and i think it would be useful for us given where we are in terms of staffing to have a conversation of what would it take in terms of resources to get to the right amount of staffing prior to 18 if that's where we are now and talking about making changes that could expand hours i'm sure this community could be very interested in working with the police department to get to that point, 2018 is a long time. but i think that to expedited the right result with staffing, there are things we can do right now. we are undermining our own efforts to grow the economy and hopefully we don't have to wait to have those conversations. >> okay. berry, did you want to say something? >> supervisor really hit on it fairly quickly as well. that is i was just going to ask chief sur if there is anything that our industry can do to expedited the staffing and the resources that might be needed to help in light of the econom
can help yourself you take a load off of us. yourself, your neighbors a few hours after, we know that [inaudible] activated a few times for y 2 k after 911 we had people. the [inaudible] has not know tried yet if you go there after a disaster you will be by yourself. a few hours after, that's when people form and that's when they help out. >> this is the home work. you don't have to write it down it's in the manual. simple things for your home. hazardous conditions in our house. there is a course evaluation in the back of the book. i'm rob [laughter]. >> okay. let's get into the program today is utility control and fire hazard material. we will teaching how to turn your utility's off and what hazardous materials to look for. >> the first thing is natural gas. what do you know about natural gas? flammable. it goes, boom. it's important to shut this off. we use it for cooking, eating and hot water. there were 40,000 people that called pg and e about their gas. that means they call turned off their gas? did they need to do that? when do you have to? when there is a problem. how l
not understood]. rec and park, and don, calem and nathan who helped us get this far. and i want to thank in particular president of the board, david chiu for always being there for the port when the waterfront has needs. and we look forward to a long future with him in that role. please join me in welcoming president chiu. (applause) >> thank you, monique, and good morning. so, when i was invited to come and participate at this event, i suggested that the elected officials, mayor lee and supervisor kim, that the three of us do a rendition of sitting on the dock by the bay. [laughter] >> and i just want to say thank you, otis redding, for sparing us of that. one of the things so special about that song is it refers to otis reding's experience of coming from thousands of miles away. i suspect it is true for all the officials here, we all came from other parts of the country to this very sacred space called san francisco. and my guess is everyone here, you either came from somewhere else, or you are the child of the grandchild of someone who decided to pick up from another dock from another
're happy you joined us for a town hall with mayor ed lee with the obama administration on the action on immigration founded here just a few blocks away. that what matters is we have a mare that understands the issues a nearest and dear it to us and that's immigration reform. since it's inception we've gotten over 20 visas alone and the feeling is we have a shortage on green talent when we need to go through the steps we need to go through and for the tech community we're focused on opening up our technical school to the global community. we're in a talent war along with a state war on services gov. and anything we can help to create change here means so much to us. we have the mayor who can creative impact so we stand behind mayor ed lee and we're thrilled he's here. i'm so excited to here what he is has to say. thank you (clapping) >> julia and kevin a thank you for being subpoena great community leaders were we're going to have a robust town meeting this is being live for my radio program. we like to let people know in advance. i'm going to ask a few questions then we're going to
to the people's house of san francisco. historic. historic day today for all of us for the struggles for many, many years i want to thank all of you for sharing this historic moment in san francisco, california. wow. it's been a long road. many years but gosh it feels good to have love triumph overcome ignorance to have equal it triumph over discrimination to have that diagrams end right here in san francisco. wonderful, wonderful. it's a great place to be today in this hall where so many marriages have taken place and so many people have loved each other. we're the very first one with phyllis. thank you phyllis thank you very, very much. and many more weddings to the celebrated in san francisco many more. i know all of you have had some of those feelings before just maybe over 9 years ago and, of course, in 2008 when i had the prim of sharing that moment. i want to thank all the people behind me it's an incredible history. mayor willie brown is there (clapping) >> at the state level back in those years all of our members of the board of supervisors. thank you. our elected officials from the
the mayor. why did we which i see central market we have carol and the mayor supporting us but we work not just as a community we work as a plays where we go into a neighborhood and a change the neighborhood. so if you look around you at the small businesses like large companies say this is a small option for them but those people can change a neighborhood. when we talk downstairs and we have investments and idea we change side neighborhood. we have 5 enterprises that can change the neighborhood and the neighborhood can change the city and we took a step towards changing the world. thank you and i'd like to call the mayor (clapping) >> well, let me begin by saying this is exciting. i want to thank adam for this wonderful opportunity and thank supervisor kim for someone who's worked in the community to see this trans formation with you to see this is incredibly exciting. it's an honor for people like randy struggled with the challenges and all of us who worked in the nonprofit including supervisor jane kim we understand this transformation is crimping open to many levels. i worked on p
bar tenders guild. the liquor laws don't allow us to use alcohol in training. the bar tenders schools in california are a joke. it's a cheap industry where hopeful bar tenders are hoping to take a $300-500 course to use colored liquid. if we are expected to do this for educational purposes, i imagine that we have to do the same thing, to go through the legislators to propose that to the public and propose it to the abc. i believe this nightlife summit was create because of problems in the public, there was problems with noise, problems with over drinking, a lot of our laws are based on that. i'm here to propose that we have more responsible training for our bar tenders and servers. the cocktail boom around the country has turned bartenders into a true professional. now that professional bartender's job is in question. >> i'm sure it's around the whole notion of where you can drink alcohol and the idea of one of those courses or presentations or event would whether or not it would constitute a public, somebody opened to the public or whether it was essentially amounting to commercial
or family responsibilities. so the center on criminal justice would advocate for an increased use or implementation of pretrial services at the local level and some on this panel will speak with more detail on that. >> let me ask miss dewint that you are obviously part of the bail association and the president of the organization, you have decades of experience. critics have argued that your association and other associations like it use their influence by way of lobbying to protect the groups financial interest. i'm wondering if you can respond to that and perhaps give us an idea what kind of lobbying your organization does? >> thank you. first of all let me thank jeff and the san francisco public defenders office for this 10th year of the justice submit summit. thank you and i don't have a prepared speech. i do want to address some of these misconceptions. there is a bail reform and we are part of the reform. we are proud to say that we are part of our regulatory agency with the department of insurance to reestablish the industry. but alongside of that we are not a one size fi
to put out the fire will not put out the fire. how many people have used a fire extinguisher before. >> may be 10 percent of you. by the end of the week you will be putting out a fire with a fire extinguisher. you don't want to learn out to house an extinguisher when they big fire is in front of you. when you turn off your natural gas and water. hazardous materials will be talked about next week. 35-40 percent of you. you will find out that all of you have hazardous material in your home. the third week is disaster medicine. you, going into a room spending 45 seconds on one person into 3 life saving techniques. by the fourth we we will teach you as search and rescuers how to keep yourself safe by identifying safe and none safe building to go into. sometimes objects are too heavy for you to liftoff of a body. we will teach you privying which will use anything you have, wood or cement blocks so you is see that people can lift heavy objects off of people. now, you have to have a plan. every program needs to have a plan. we can't say, here are your skills. class 6, after half an hour
, and it has its own beauty, but you have to get beyond what you're used to. as long as people recognize they're moving to the desert and give up this notion that they have to bring eastern vegetation with them and make the necessary adaptations in their own life, desert communities can continue to live. man: the biggest water user in the desert is turf. turf uses a lot of irrigation and uses spray irrigation, so what we've done here is use artificial turf. you're never going to be able to achieve the look of back east or the look of, say, california, with subtropical plants, but our landscapes are still lush and use about 30% of what the subtropical landscape with turf would use. las vegas has adopted a drought tolerant ordinance. we're using less water today than we used five years ago, despite over 300,000 new residents. i think it's a pretty amazing example as to how a town can really turn on a dime if there's the political will and if the public gets behind it. narrator: even the casinos and resorts have adapted to efficient water use. mulroy: the las vegas strip uses only 3% of all the
, as well for our rec and park department as phil knows all too well many rec centers still use dial up service. when we think about registering our children for camps and play grounds, what we need to do in our daily lives, but also our government on a daily basis to use technology, this will be an incredible boone to our rec and park department and something we should all be very excited about. in terms of the details of the gift, google is providing a $600,000 financial gift to our city with no strings attached. i think a lot of the prior debate around free wi-fi in san francisco that never moved forward was because of different questions about business models or so forth, to emphasize this is a free gift of financial benefit to the city of san francisco with no strings attached. the money will come through sf city which will manage the installation of the wi-fi network from beginning to end, and our department of technology will accept that gift on behalf of the city and county of san francisco. and ultimately rec and park will be the host of the wi-fi network on their properties. a
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
that are used widely today and administered privately, there are some difference, one of those which i think you're getting to is that the medical reimbursement accounts administered by the city have no prescribers other than them being available broadly for medical services. >> you said earlier, i want to get the number right, that about 35% of employers that use these hra's have not allowed in this past year that the money be used for health insurance? >> that is correct. >> if that money is now going to be used in healthy san francisco let's say, will healthy san francisco place restrictions on the use of that money? i would imagine that we are not going to prohibit people from using that to buy health insurance? >> that sounds unlikely. i would be reluctant to speculate but i can say there's no such restrictions on the administration of those accounts currently or over the five or six years they've been maintaining those accounts forward. er >> i think that's a great thing, you have more people using that money for health insurance. in terms of the medical reimbursement accounts, is there an
speaker. >> good evening, thanks for having us, supervisor, my name is jane sanderval, as i currently work in an emergency department, i know first hand how a reduction in community resources leads to an increased dependence in emergency departments, often the emergency department is used as a primary means of health care, i see this on a daily basis. the potential search in ed clientele due to a loss of nuances from the health care ordinance will tax an overloaded and overutilized and sometimes underfunded and understaffed department. i'm concerned ed wait times will increase, as they provide access to preventive services sufns immunizations and health screening, i'm concerned without these sss, clientele may not seek care until they have a crisis in their life. it is unclear to me how mandating an uninsured person to purchase health care [inaudible] those less fortunate are not limit today the marginalized and people who have become a casualty, these people will not be able to afford the co-payment and is deductibles from the new insurance exchange. the loss of healthy san francisco woul
's a little hollywood, it's dogpatch. it used to be the portola, half of it. my heart is still with you, but i'm glad like the speaker said, it is whole. and that is what's important, is that that neighborhood remains whole so that our city will be whole. you agree? [cheering and applauding] cheers >> so, a few years back there was this little idea to take back the bayview and really began to rewrite the history and the narrative that we often hear about in bayview. and it actually started, ironically, with a small little abandoned swath of land that has grown up to become the cuseda garden. and it's the thought child and the physical manifestation of hard work, of a few community leaders that got together and rolled up their sleeves and got to work. and tonight i have the honor to introduce one of the co-founders, his name is jeffery betcher. where are you? get up here. and jeff is going to introduce to you as he escorts ms. annette young smith to the stage. this lady, ladies and gentlemen, is a lifetime achievement award winner. please, please welcome her to the stage. (applause) >> i can't
to an incident or you see something, you take a breath, assess the situation, use all your senses and think about what you are going to do. those are all components of what we call the size-up. there are many components to size up. what's one of the components to size up? gathering facts. you want to assess the type of damage there is. what kind of situation is it? what is the issue? is it a medical problem? if it's a medical, is it a big hurt or a little hurt? is it a rescue situation and if it's a fire, do you have the resources to control or extinguish that fire? how about your situation, do you have all your people? do you have all the resources that you need? have you collected all the material that you need if you are going to start doing a lifting exercise because someone is trapped? because you never start a rescue, you never start a lifting exercise, never start anything, unless you know you are going to be able to finish it, have enough of the resources to do it. and do you have the right equipment? you need specialized equipment? do you have access to that? maybe, maybe not. so size up
provides them with that choice, we want them to choose us. a recent survey indicated that 60% of low-income individuals who are uninsured would change their provider if they were given the choice to do so so we are responding to that challenge and integrating the service we offer throughout our delivery system so we do a better job to coordinate the care our patients need, we're working to improve quality and capacity to increase access to care, we're enhancing our patient's experience by shortening waiting times and increasing our efficiency in customer service and these are exactly the items that barbara is at the health department working on today. our second role is more citywide in nature and related to our mission to protect and promote the health of all san franciscans, we're maximizing enrollment into the health insurance options under the nca and i'll focus on this a little bit more. the health department has identified several key factors to the successful implementation of the aca in san francisco. the first is personal responsibility, this is not just the requirement unde
wallace came up with the idea of a garden tour and a lot of us thought, a garden tour? our neighborhood? who is going to come? well, we had every -- we've done it for six years. every year we've grown incrementally. after the first two years of raising money for the library -- there's our new library -- we then it was such a great community builder that we recently decided to keep wanting to volunteering and do it. we established a scholarship at city college for the horticultural department. and we have just gone gangbusters. we get good press and we get to see everybody's neighbor -- all our neighbors' gardens. because of the way san francisco s you get to be veuyer because usually you have to go through their garage or their house to see the gardens. and ruth gets known through the neighborhood because she's constantly peeking over fences and leaving fliers in people's mailboxes saying, do you want to be on the garden tour, and all this sort of thing. but anyway, so, we've -- just to show you how much the neighborhood has gotten to know each other, all the people in the portola, wave
and go to the u.s. to work and they never have a problem and they can stay here for long. why is there an exception to >>> >>> i'm audrey joseph. the acting chair of the entertainment commission. july will mark the 10th year of the entertainment commission and we as an industry have come a long way. our venues are safer, we have survived the recession, our city has produced an economic impact report that speaks to our value as an industry, we are looking forward to the next economic impact report on daytime events and festival and we continue to improve our permitting process most recently the help of supervisor scott wiener extending limited live permits to d j's. today we are introducing to the best i am practices manual based in security and we are discussing issues that are veflt relevant to us all. the 90s, san francisco nightlife awards recognized excellent and creative content and patron experience in the nightlife industry. we as an industry deserve that recognition. and now, a few highlights from the 90s. >> welcome to the 2013, 90 awards and the san francisco enter
think the city should have cameras. there are places where that is useful. having cameras near registers can save many dollars. if you believe your clientele is potentially violent on damaging in terms of graffiti cost, you can have many reasons to have cameras. if a business wants to install their cameras and use them, they should bear that cost. if footage exist that law enforcement wants access to, there is a process that allows the law enforcement access to that. so, if a business wants to install cameras, absolutely they should bear the cost, but having law enforcement require cameras, that cost should not be passed onto the business. >> i have very mixed feelings about cameras but i tend to lean to what berry is talking about. we seem to be karening willie and nilly to this camera side. we are crossing the line now between reasonable, video surveillance in public being a reasonable part of the policing or police action and you get into the unreasonable police infringement of the 4th amendment. let me read you one of these conditions so you can see what i'm talking about. i have pr
other people in your city. there it is, a place for us to gather as nert members and there's our nert ics area. here is our structure. same kind of set up, sort of our version. command policy section, the planning group, they are up on top. then once things get rolling, you have your operations section, logistics section. here are our objectives on the nert team, figure out if it's big, if it's small, how do we keep track of what's going on? do we just remember it? are we going to rely on our computers, our pc's? no, we have to write it down the old-fashioned way. address, is there a fire, yes or no, damage, are there people injured, dead, can you get there. where, what, any sort of damage, are there people involved, can you get to it? here is a nert status sheet. basically if you send somebody out, you want to send the members' names, what time they went out, when they came back, what the assignment was, any comments, and if you have an incident number that would be nice. who is the safety person? we don't want to send people out, just hey, go do this. we want to keep track of it. if
awards here at san francisco city hall. thank you all so much for joining us here tonight. it is an honor to be here. my name is daniel homsby and i am the program manager for the neighborhood department networks. an honor to see you here. many of the same faces for the fifth year for the men awards. let's give you an a plays for coming back. (applause) >> and celebrating one of the most important things we have in san francisco, which is our neighborhoods. without further ado, i'd like to start the program off by introducing my colleague, christina palone, the new director for the mayor's office for neighborhoods. christina palone. (applause) >> good evening, everyone. i'm happy to be a part of such a great ebit that celebrates the contributions made by residents and organizations throughout the city to make san francisco one of the greatest places to live. the mayor's office of neighborhood services also known as mons focuses on neighborhood outreach and engagement. it is an honor to be here with community leaders who are dedicated to the same principles and are positive
to be playing with another team but what if it is other team had 13 or fourteen people. we have to see the u.s. as a team are the other countries and we're limiting the team on the field and if canada is allowing their team to to compete against us. to not allow the 49ers to come to the game is not making sense. you want to have the largest team i can in order to beat the competition and so i have this commercial in their head. all those comments immigrants are lazy and taking our jobs. imagine the same comments have been made as each immigration wave like the italians and now the mexicans but somehow they've contributed to society and we're growing because when you take a diversity of ideas they don't take your jobs. somebody said that the way we have today, the system we have a help wanted sign on one side and on the other side we have a bored with guns. >> let me build on that then because again, the vote in the senate is happening we believe it's going to be successful. the real battle is in the house. so let's talk about the battle in the house. without naming names a group of 80 executiv
other crimes in the future. i would say if we all now agree or at least many of us agree with justice kennedy that the result has been a prison system that is barbaric that doesn't belong in a civilized society and serious atonement and i think you would recognize in the california prisons to meet that. let me say why it's a risk. it's always so reasonable to see risk as a way on out of these. i don't think i need to remind those in the room that an entire population were incarcerated for risk. nobody was held accountable for it either. if you look at the way this is a risk, you see racial class is at the end of the day the right kind of community ties and is risk reduction. professor simon, let me ask a follow-up. i want to get an idea of what a system you are advocating would look like. let's say you have arraignment for somebody in a case alleging violence. maybe an armed robbery or sexual assault of some kind. are you comfortable with someone having a right to be released on their own recognizant under the theory that the police should do their work and make sure that person does
about earthquakes and we are going to talk about the issues that make us particularly vulnerable in san francisco and talk about the policy issues and do earthquake response and hopefully in our earthquake recovery. pat, who is a structural engineer and a guy that has looked at earthquake building upgrades in san francisco, yeah. than anybody and he has his earthquake dog harvey. >> okay. that's enough. and john paxton who is a part of caps and it's a community action plan for seismic safety and sponsored by the department of building. and what are the significant impacts of earthquake and how can we mitigate that to meet the goals we want to make. one of the things we want to talk about are, what are your reasonable expectations? people have different goals about what they expect. a lot of people say, i live in a house, the city wouldn't let me live in a house that wasn't safe, would they? i live in a brand-new house and it's absolutely fine. those are unreasonable expectations and why they are. there's, for example. nothing that the earthquake proof. that's always stuff inside that i
really difficult for us to get any tracks to do that and let the judge decide. but to step up and say i'm not going to let a judge decide this. i'm going to own this and say we made a mistake. when we have prosecutors that do that, we have to honor that and recognize it what it did take inform are them to be able to step forward and do it. also our attorney general's have to be able to step back and say, okay, court's have an approved this conviction, they haven't reversed it but i'm convinced that it's wrong. i don't know how else but to point out to them to plead with them and meet with them and those that know them, respect them and ask them and those that have an audience, tell them that that's the right course for them to take. >> innocent projects, most of them are privately funded and they rely on local fund raising. they are not funding at government entities. it's very difficult to do the work you do and i commend you for it. what kind of demand do you have for the services that you provide? >> an unmeetable demand. you are right. we are privately funded and we scrounge for fun
about alcohol that maybe on the horizon. tell us about that. >> as far as treatment for alcoholism, the first things to consider is how somebody gets into treatment in the first place. there is 4 l's, liver, livelihood, lover or the law. those 4 things. liver, livelihood, lover and law. within those l's is when somebody shows up in my door, someone suffering, a family member suffering who brings somebody in. when it company ms to treat we know there is different types of treatment, there is evidence base treatment. there is good evidence for it, we do it. there is evidence free treatment, there is no evidence whatsoever and there is evidence proof treatment. one of those evidence proof treatment is incarceration treatment. there was an office inspection in general report and eventually matt case became supervisor for it. i have been involved in other places. treatment in custody doesn't work. flash incarceration does not work. as far as the treatment that do work for alcoholism, alcoholism is a chronic disease like diabetes. hypertension and emphysema. when we look at outcomes for
excludes us from the affordable care act, we are not able to buy insurance from the exchanges but the only solution for us is through healthy sf, i have an older brother who was diagnosed with brain cancer three years ago, my parents were worried he would not be able to sur va*if because we couldn't afford expensive treatment, lucky a doctored was able to make sure my brother was taken care of and with radiation and surgery, he's home after recovering from rehabilitation, i'm happy he got the treatment he needed and healthy sf will give him the opportunity to complete his road to recovery, for my family's sake, it must not stop there. without healthy sf, i don't know how my brother would have gotten better. they -- i didn't know my family would be illegible for healthy sf, it is the only option for indocumented residence, even passing the immigration requirement in congress, under the current proposal, undocumented residents are being intentionally left out of accessing health care, and having access to health care is a human right. as a city that is strong to have equality for all, pleas
to as the aca or obama care which is something that we have affectionately appropriated because the term was use ined a derogatory way, we think it's a positive way, this law does many things but perhaps most importantly, it makes preventive care more accessible and more affordable for so many americans and i'm excited to be here to begin a series of hearings that we will be holding on the affordable care act so that we have in san francisco a smooth as transition and implementation as possible. today's hearing will focus on how the aca and our local health care security ordinance work in tandem to make health care and health insurance truly accessible to as many san franciscans as possible. you know, the thing about the health care security ordinance, it was really an example of how san franciscans can come together, you had labor, community activist and is the business community coming forward and passing an ordinance that set an example for how you can have universal health care for the rest of the country. in september of this year, i plan to hold a hearing on how to enroll for health insura
speaking and community talk back events. the film i hope will become a gathering point for people to use and say this is what's happening in our jurisdiction. this shows the experience of just a few lawyers. there are many people struggling to do a great job across the country. >> what's your website? >> we'll be taking questions. now let's move to john rapping who is one of the individuals featured in the film. john, i remember when you first talked about starting a training center for public defenders, no one took you seriously. so what happened? you created it and you have been successfully training defenders. what motivated you to do that and how did it all come to be? >> first, i have been waiting 10 years. there is no doubt in my mind there is no civil rights struggle going on this country to make sure that poor people have lawyers. but it's something i really didn't understand when i started as a public defender. i started in a well resource office with manageable case loads and i was able to give clients with a gideon vision and then i moved to georgia for the statewide public d
protection. gloves, eye protection, and masks and sanitation and hand washing and who among us don't have a nick or a cut on their hand and are you going to touch someone's blood and your in tac skin will protect you from most ilknows. however, if you have a cut on your hand you have a path for infection to get inside of you and you want a pair of latex gloves -- several pairs of glo gloves that you can put on and change as you go from patient t patient hopefully and at least wash your hands and disinfect your hands between patient contacts and the eyes are like an open wound and path to get into your body and glasses and take the old glasses and throw them in your kit and you have something to wear and face mask and of course dust and dirt and all of these disasters throw up dust and dirt and especially in a dryer season and push comes t shove a band da bandana. and after a disaster is not the time to let your hygiene slip and it's a time to tighten it u and communitycable diseases and if it's wet and not yours don't touch it. gloves and every patient contac and don't touch blood and it'
and here to celebrate with us. we are going to start today by showing a brief video explaining the gideon decisions >> take this empty lot. today you would never know it but history was made here. mostly all is gone and so are the people. the principle they left is still standing. it was almost as bad at life. >> it was a constitutional hero, but the cases that come to the court don't come from the winners in society. they come from the losers. clarence gideon was involved in the justice system since he was a kid. he had been getting in trouble. >> trouble seemed to find gideon. literally small change had gone miss ing from this cigarette machine, maybe $5 total. that's the pool hall there on the bottom. some wine, some beer and a few bottles of coca-cola were gone. the witnesses saw gideon that night with pockets full of change. gideon found himself facing serious time in prison. >> i have no council >> why do you not have council? >> i would like someone to represent me. >> i would have to deny you request to a point you council in this case. >> gideon,000 this was unfair. >> by asking
to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovered rust on the tunnel's valves. there were concerns that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement.
think a lot of us don't pay enough attention to the nonstructural damage. here we are in this room, nonstructural damage can be to the sealing, so here's a story. in the 1989 earthquake, that's the day the marriott hotel opened. it has that little bar at the top. up at the top of building, it swayed back and forth and the ceiling planes shaved off a sprinkler and it flooded the top floor. >> it's a big problem. in north ridge, it was a huge problem. there was tremendous losses because your shoot rock gets wet. it's like having a flood. we are on a group trying to look at all the issue in san francisco and make recommendations. whether it responds and does well. the subsequent issue is fire, which we haven't talked about here. with fire goes gas line breaks and water line breaks not being able to protect the structure once it happens. all those utility things come into play. as a homeowner's association, you have to anticipate as a resident of san francisco, there's going to be a lot of ground deformation and our utilities will have problems. we recently had window storms and while
to karen chen from the public defenders office. karen, can you -- how about if you start by giving us an overview of how the city handles this conflict between treatment and civil liberties. >> an involuntary hold starts in san francisco when a peace officer or a clinician makes the determination that the person is due to a mental disorder, is a danger to others or danger to self or gravely disabled. gravely disabled means that person does not have the ability to provide for basic needs such as food, clothing and shelter. and the legal representation starts in most cases the first 3 days of the involuntary hold during the initial psychiatric evaluation and then the legal representation also continues with if the person is asked to be stayed or referred for further treatment up to 14 days. during this phase, the attorneys will represent the clients about whether or not they will have to stay on this hold, whether they have to take medications. if a person after at the end of the 14 day hold is found that may need further treatment, the person maybe subject to a conservatorship under t
, that actually was very much a reflection of what was going on when you did it. can you tell us about those madonna corset years? >> yes, it is a kind of a reflection of what is happening. also a reflection of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the
going to use my chance just to ask one last question. do you believe that you have marked fashion history? >> it is difficult to say. is it my purpose? i do not know. i think that's everybody is marking fashion history in a way. as much as journalists because they show the people. what is fashion history? some old clothes that you can find may be in the free-market? books, magazines, newspapers? i think that i am part of that, but to think that me, i'm mark -- i do not think so. it is not exactly my purpose. it really seems very selfish to do what you love. >> i'm glad i managed more or less to silence you with my question. [laughter] i would like to say that i believe you have marked fashion history in the best way by creating clothes, which have been a mirror to society as it changed and as it happened, and you will be known for that as much as for the beauty of the close. thank you so much for giving us the chance to talk to you. [applause]
the single payer or many of us is the on the answer and in 94 or 96 that the state ballot that passed, that the single payer initiative, san franciscans passed it, californians didn't, san franciscans passed it, when we got to cfo's, we couldn't have it all by itself in san francisco, so we brought in all of the different force, we brought the federal government funding, the state funding and the employer's funding to help provide access for everything, acso is not just san francisco healthy, healthy san francisco, it's both, the mandate from the employer so they should pay their share as well as everybody, and as your attorney said today, we think aca is coming in, we're excited about the possibilities, we wanted to work but we need both systems in this city to ensure that all of our san franciscans, undocumented people who work less than 30 hours a week, all san franciscans can have access to health care, please, it's not that complicated, people won't make it that comply skated, we need both systems implemented as soon as possible, thank you very much. >> next speak e please. er >>
eludes us. i want to a break from the reading and talk about why that issue is so hard for people to grasp and why reform efforts have been stymied. it's been interesting for me reporting on this last year-and-a-half and trying to talk to people at the water cooler and a bar, my friends at dinner parties, whatever, and i would just say the words indigent defense and people's eyes would glaze over and they are like what is that? what does that have to do with me. even the word indigent. i started use is poor people. it's hard for people to understand why this issue matters. in the course of my reporting over a year-and-a-half, all the experts in the legal system, i would always end my interviews with the same question, which is, so you have this problem, why is it so hard to fix? why is it so hard for people to understand this need? what i got a lot of different answers, but i think what i really discovered was that for most people who don't live in this world that all of you live in which is working as public defenders or advocates or in the criminal justice system, you know a l
on who they are, but it is not a question of color. for me, both of us were beautiful. and i loved color. color of the skin. tattoo on the skin, which is a kind of color. some blue colors that you add. and i wanted to show that. when i started, i remember that there were some beautiful girls. they're beautiful. but i felt like, ok, but there is also beauty. i have a girlfriend which was modeling for me that i met very early when i started that was from a french colony. she was beautiful and black and very inspiring, very nice. i say, yes, why not. for me, a difference was beautiful. they looked to me, and i wanted to show it. another kind of different was the fact that when i saw farida, i said, my god, she is incredible. i was very impressed by her beauty. very frightened even by her beauty. she was kind of a very arrogant imperial. and african and beauty with a special expression. not arrogant. but beautiful. i said, i want to show this girl which is different. does not know how to walk as a model. they have their own personality. i remember this year i was asking a professional model
us because of the leadership skills you are learning on
to be an nba player. regardless of playing in college or nba, i expect many of you have be leading us because of the leadership skills you are learning on
and i'm not coming home unless you let me bring my boyfriend but remember every one of us came from somewhere where there's no protections even in the face of those ruling. so there's many of our lgbt partners are watching with a - their day to day life in 37 states is not going to change so our commitment has to be look what we're doing here and we're going to help you where you live. we're not going to leave anyone behind. have a great day. have a great day. have a great weekend so are you going out tonight? i can't. my parents say i have to be home right after work. ugh. that's so gay. totally gay. ugh. that is so emma and julia. why are you saying, "that's so emma and julia"? well, you know, when something is dumb or stupid, you say, "that's so emma and julia." who says that? everyone. announcer: imagine if who you are were used as an insult. awards here at san francisco city hall. thank you all so much for joining us here tonight. it is an honor to be here. my name is daniel homsby and i am the program manager for the neighborhood department networks. an honor to see you here.
dancing, playing ping-pong, and arts and crafts. >> use it for whatever you want to do, you can do it here. >> on friday, november 16th, the dedication and ribbon cutting took place at the sunset playground and recreation center celebrating its renovation. it was raining, but the rain clearly did not dampen the spirits of the dignitaries, community members, and children in attendance. [cheering and applauding] ♪ ♪ >> the garden contains plants referred to by william shakespeare's plays and poems. located near the academy of sciences, shakespeare's garden was designed in 1928 by the california spring and wild flower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil little garden tucked behind the path of a charming rot iron gate with romantic magic. the overarching cherry trees, the gorgeous big walkway and brick wall, the benches, the rustic sun dial. the pack picnic, lovely bench, enjoy the sunshine and soft breeze and let the
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